50 years on the team at the GSPCA remember the Supertanker Torrey Canyon and all the wildlife affected

Submitted by Steve on 22:41, 16th Mar, 2017 | 0

On the 18th March 1967 Supertanker Torrey Canyon ran aground on rocks between Land's End and the Scilly Isles and leaked its cargo of oil into the sea.

The 974-ft (297m) tanker, which was carrying a cargo of 119,328 tonnes of crude oil, hit Pollard's Rock in the Seven Stones reef. The oil patch was believed to be the biggest ever to threaten the West Country coastline and the Channel Islands.

There were fears that the supertanker could catch fire or break-up in heavy seas.

Share

WEATHER WARNING - With the windy stormy weather please watch out for oiled seabirds & seal pups

Submitted by Steve on 21:07, 17th Nov, 2016 | 0

Over the last week across the Bailiwick the weather has been challenging our wonderful wildlife.

From Poppy the grey seal pup in Alderney to oiled guillemots found due to the wet windy weather the GSPCA is being kept very busy.

In the last week we have had two oiled guillemots both on the South West Coast.

Meep Meep and Robinson as they have been named are doing well after their bathes but as the bad weather continues the GSPCA are braced for likelihood of other animals affected by the weather needing our help.

Share

Oiled Guillemots almost ready for their trip back to the wild

Submitted by Steve on 13:28, 19th Feb, 2016 | 0

We are pleased to report that 4 of the rescued oiled guillemots found around Guernsey in January are clean from oil and have been rehabilitating on one of our pools.

Lihou, Pegasus, Bob and Rockmount who were all oiled and very poorly when they arrived at the GSPCA have all received a number of washes, treatment, medication, time in an intensive care unit, a lot of fish and have been getting use to being outside over the last few weeks.

Share

Please watch out for oiled birds around the coast after the rough weather - Could you please donate or sponsor their care

Submitted by Steve on 15:46, 5th Jan, 2016 | 0

With all of the rough and stormy sustained weather recently the GSPCA are bracing for a potentially busy period of sick and injured animals and birds.

Only in the last few hours have two oiled guillemots been rescued and arrived at the Shelter and there are likely to be many more.

The reason we and other coastal animal charities see this increase after stormy weather is that crude oil that has settled on the sea bed gets stirred up and floats to the surface where the birds sadly get coated and then find it difficult to fly, preen, hunt and care for themselves.

Share

4 oiled birds rescued at the GSPCA today - Watch out for oiled birds around the coast after the rough weather

Submitted by GSPCA on 16:36, 10th Feb, 2014 | 0

After a second spell of rough weather this year the GSPCA has already rescued 4 oiled birds so far today.

The reason we and other coastal animal charities see this increase is that crude oil that has settled on the sea bed gets stirred up and floats to the surface where the birds sadly get coated and then find it difficult to fly, preen, hunt and care for themselves.

We closely monitor the locations of where the birds are found and tidal movements in case they aren't isolated incidents.

Share

Watch out for oiled birds around the coast after the rough weather

Submitted by GSPCA on 14:50, 16th Jan, 2014 | 0

With rough weather the GSPCA often finds itself rescuing and caring for oiled birds.

The reason we and other coastal animal charities see this increase is that crude oil that has settled on the sea bed gets stirred up and floats to the surface where the birds sadly get coated and then find it difficult to fly, preen, hunt and care for themselves.

We closely monitor the locations of where the birds are found and tidal movements in case they aren't isolated incidents.

We have had 7 oiled birds in the last week but sadly a Razorbill and 2 Guillemots were to weak to save.

Share

Good News as Ships are banned from discharging the pollutant PIB which has killed 1000's of British Birds in 2013

Submitted by GSPCA on 11:24, 22nd Oct, 2013 | 0

The GSPCA are pleased to hear that the polluntant that killed and injured more than 4,000 birds, called polyisobutene (PIB) between Cornwall and Sussex, and on the Channel Islands can no longer be dumped at sea after a worldwide ban was agreed.

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has reclassified PIBs from 2014 which means ships will only be able to wash their tanks and dispose of all PIB residues while in port.
Share

Oiled Alderney Razorbill Gillette is back in the wild after weeks of care

Submitted by GSPCA on 16:05, 21st May, 2013 | 0

On the 8th February this year the GSPCA received a Razorbill from Alderney which had been affected by crude oil.

Staff at Alderney Animal Welfare had cared for the bird and done a wonderful job removing the crude oil from the its feathers after being found on the coast of Alderney. If it hadn't been for their staff this bird would certainly have perished.

Share

Another oiled bird at the GSPCA - What to do if you see any bird affected by oil

Submitted by GSPCA on 20:12, 16th May, 2013 | 0

Today the GSPCA received another oiled bird.  This time a Gull was rescued from Chouet and brought into the Animal Shelter.

Although it is not thought to be the PIB (polyisobutene) that has killed thousands of see birds along the south coast of England the GSPCA are on high alert in case of any outbreak.

You may remember only a number of weeks ago an oiled bird was found dead in Alderney due to PIB.  Here is some simple advice on what to do if you find sea life affected by this or any oiled substance -

Share

Channel Island NGOs call on Island Governments to help prevent further mass seabird deaths

Submitted by GSPCA on 12:33, 24th Apr, 2013 | 0

In an unprecedented joint letter Channel Island Wildlife and Welfare organisations are calling on politicians representing the environment in the 3 main islands to lobby the UK parliament to help prevent future catastrophic discharges of the chemical polyisobutene (PIB). 

Share